KISD to use COVID-19 money to pay back for new flooring, HVAC | Education and learning

KISD to use COVID-19 money to pay back for new flooring, HVAC | Education and learning

Following acquiring extra than $134 million in federal COVID-19 aid money, the Killeen Impartial College District is shifting its shelling out strategy to include things like funding for cash advancement initiatives like new heating and air-conditioning units and flooring.

Considering the fact that the commencing of the pandemic, Killeen ISD has gained a whole of $134,556,351 from Uncle Sam in the variety of federal Elementary and Secondary College Unexpected emergency Reduction.

As of February, KISD Chief Money Officer Megan Bradley reported the district had $87.5 million in federal COVID-19 funds remaining that should be invested just before it expires. Of the $87.5 million, $21.1 million need to be applied by Sept. 30, 2023, and $66.4 million by Sept. 30, 2024.







Killeen ISD Main Fiscal Officer Megan Bradley speaks all through a faculty board conference on March 29 about the district’s paying out plan for federal COVID-19 reduction funds.


Just before the district’s expending system modified, KISD spent about $36 million on supplemented state help salaries for nurses, clinic aides teacher retention and recruitment stipends a reading academy h2o bottles iPads and circumstances as perfectly as the district’s math and literacy centre, according to district paperwork. A different $9.7 million was expended on iPads, laptops, hotspots and payroll charges throughout the COVID-19 closure in 2020, and individual protecting tools.

“We do have a clock ticking in regards to paying out down all those resources,” KISD Superintendent John Craft told the faculty board in the course of a board meeting on March 29.

According to Bradley, the district has not been able to execute its initial system for a part of the federal cash.

“We experienced a various program, we wished to have a good deal of interventionists, a great deal of counselors, and we just haven’t been in a position to seek the services of those people,” Bradley explained to the college board on March 29.

The CFO reported the district could come across other employs for the cash to make sure the unused money do not expire.

The unique strategy for the remaining dollars was to use it to fund salaries for nurses, aides, counselors and interventionist, as properly as a new behavioral health method.

“We had intent to commit it on a behavioral health program — however do — but it is been complicated using the services of for that program,” she explained. “We’re nevertheless doing work with Introduction on that, but we’re viewing vacancy fears there like we have in our standard price range.”

Nationwide, university districts are battling to fill general education instructing positions, considerably fewer other specialised occupations.

“So as we have not been ready to seek the services of all the interventionists, and counselors, and other positions that we have been making an attempt to retain the services of… we’ve now shifted our gears some and are now organizing to devote this income on HVAC replacements, and flooring,” she explained.

By paying for cash improvement tasks that would typically be funded as a result of the district’s typical fund budget with federal COVID-19 funds, Bradley explained KISD would have far more common fund revenue to put in direction of the district’s impending personnel fork out increase.

The district’s new paying out system for the federal resources, according to March 29th university board files, now involves the salaries of workforce “directly linked to scholar learning” and “software to guide with student understanding,” in addition roof replacements and buses.

Craft mentioned the district’s been “highly encouraged” by the Texas Training Agency to occur up with a approach to ensure federal money are not “left on the desk.”

“What you are viewing, type of the 50,000-foot see appropriate now, is the complete intent to spend these money down, in essence subplanting with standard basic fund expenses as a result freeing up some common funds to do some matters above the class of the upcoming two several years,” Craft said.

The district should have paying out variations more than $5,000 approved by the Texas Instruction Company, but Bradley claimed so significantly the training agency has not denied any of the district’s requests.

“One of our allowable expenditures is sustaining operations, so just about anything we would generally do could be spent from these resources,” she mentioned.

KISD school board secretary Brett Williams mentioned he questioned why the district could not use the COVID-19 resources to pay for new faculty design.







Brett Williams

Killeen ISD Board Secretary Brett Williams.


“How about including more buildings so our school rooms wouldn’t be as crowded,” Williams questioned. “Would that qualify?”

Craft mentioned the COVID-19 money could not be used for new construction.

“You cannot develop facilities — which is just one disallowable cost, I guess, but there are some caveats to that, like talking about capital improvement assignments,” Craft stated in March. “HVAC models, improved HVAC filtering, these are all allowable costs that are cash advancement but we simply cannot just plop 80 million down on a manufacturer new center school.”

Searching at preliminary finances figures for the duration of the most current board assembly on April 12, Bradley said the move to use federal COVID-19 money for cash enhancement projects would depart about $20.4 million to pay for worker pay out increases.

The district’s personnel compensation strategy will be introduced in the course of a workshop at 9 a.m. Tuesday at KISD headquarters, 200 North W.S. Young Push in Killeen.